Mackintosh

THIS is a Celtic clan. In 1672 the Chiefs of Mackintosh were declared by the Lord Lyon King of Arms Chiefs of Clan Chattan. There have been Mackintosh Chiefs for nearly five hundred years. Moy is said to have become theirs in 1336. In 1526 Lachlan, Laird of Mackintosh, was slain by James Malcolmson. The Mackintoshes captured Malcolmson, and cut him to pieces. In 1550 William, 15th Mackintosh, paid a friendly visit to Huntly Castle, but was treacherously beheaded by order of the Countess. In 1689 Mackintosh claimed Glenroy and Glenspean. Keppoch kept him out, and defeated him at Mulroy, the last clan battle. Mackintosh died 1704. His son, Lachlan, died childless 1731, and for a hundred years thereafter no son succeeded a father amongst the Mackintosh chiefs, this remarkable occurrence being ascribed to the curse said to have been placed on the Chief by a jilted lady. The clan fought at Culloden. The Chief remained neutral, and MacGillivray of Dunmaglass commanded. Γ†neas Mackintosh of Mackintosh was created a Baronet by George III, but died childless. His kinsman, the Hon. Angus Mackintosh, residing in Canada, succeeded him, and from him descended the subsequent chiefs. The Mackintosh country is Brae Lochaber, Badenoch, and Strathnairn. The clan historian described the chiefship of the Mackintoshes as territorialΒ— passing with the duthus.

Gordon

THE Gordons had their origin in the Lowlands. The Scottish Gordons are descended from Sir Adam Gordon, the friend of Wallace, and to whom Bruce granted the lands of Huntly or Strathbogie. He fell at Halidon Hill in 1333. Alexander, 3rd Earl of Huntly, fought at Flodden. George, 6th Earl, was created a Marquis in 1599. George, 4th Marquis, was made Duke of Gordon in 1684. The Dukedom lapsed in 1836, and the Marquisate went to the Earl of Aboyne. The Earls of Aberdeen are descended from Patrick Gordon of Methlic, who fell in battle at Arbroath in 1445. Ten Baronetcies pertain to this clan: Gordonstoun, Cluny, Lismore, Lochinvar, Park, Dalpholly, Earlstoun, Embo, Halkin, Niton. Two regiments have been raised from it. The 92nd, or Gordon Highlanders, raised in 1794, and the old 75th and 92nd linked together, are now the Gordon Highlanders. The Marquis of Huntly is chief of the Gordon clan.

Huntly

From Wilsons’ 1819 – Marchioness of Huntly’s tartan. Also from ‘Old and Rare Scottish Tartans’ published in 1893 by D.W. Stewart. The book was illustrated by samples woven in silk. The Huntly district tartan is known to have been worn at the time of the ’45 rebellion by Brodies, Forbes’, Gordons, MacRaes, Munros and Rosses… Continue reading Huntly