Bissy

MacNaughton

THE MacNaughtons are of Celtic origin. They are descended from a Pictish king named Nechtan or Nauchton, who founded Abair Neachtain or Abernethy. Their lands lay along the shore of Loch Awe, in Lorn. Alexander III granted the custody of the castle and island of Fraoch Eilean, in Loch Awe, to Gilchrist MacNaughton. The clan fought against Bruce. In 1426 Donald MacNaughton was Bishop-elect of Dunkeld. Sir Alexander MacNaughton of that Ilk was slain at Flodden. Alexander MacNaughton of that Ilk raised a magnificent band of Archers for Charles I, whom he served faithfully. He clove to Charles II likewise, was a courtier, and died in London. A complimentary letter was sent by James VII to MacNaughton of that Ilk in 1689. A branch of the clan settled in Antrim, Ireland. They acquired an estate and castle called Benuardin and were honoured with a Baronetcy. Their line was recognised as chiefs by the Court of the Lord Lyon, and the present Baronet is the Chief of Clan MacNaughton. The old seat of the race was Dunderawe Castle a tall tower on Loch Fyne.

MacDonald

THE MacDonalds are of very ancient origin. The clan founder was the heroic Somerled, who freed his countrymen from the Norse yoke, and rose to power that no subject has equalled. He died in 1164, leaving three sons. The second, Reginald, died in 1207, leaving, with other issue, an eldest son, Donald, from whom the clan takes its name. As Lords of the Isles and Earls of Ross, the Clan Donald were the greatest of the Highland clans, their chief until 1493 ranking as an Island Sovereign. After the fall of the Lords of the Isles, first Glengarry, and then the Lords of Sleat held the chiefship. The Chief of the Glencoe MacDonalds, Mac-Vic-Ian-Mac-Ian, was of Royal descent, and was, with nearly all his clan, massacred by Campbell of Glenlyon in 1692. He had remained constant in his adherence to King James, and loyally took the oath to serve William of Orange, but was rewarded with as foul an act of treachery as was ever perpetrated. Glencoe is the traditional home of the poet Ossian.

Fraser

THE Frasers are French in origin. Clan Pipe Music: “Cumha Mhic Shimidh” (“Lovat’s Lament”); March: “Spaidsearachd Mhic Shimidh” (Lovat’s March). Gilbert of Fraser is mentioned in 1109. Sir Simon Fraser of Oliver Castle was done to death by Edward I. Hugh was the first designed of Lovat, and from him descends the “Clan Fraser of Lovat.” Hugh, second of Lovat, was made a Baron about 1460. Hugh, 3rd Lord, fell fighting with the MacRonalds near Lochlochy in 1544. Hugh, 9th Lord, died childless. Simon Fraser of Beaufort took possession. His son, Simon, styled himself Master of Lovat, but for his discreditable conduct he had to flee to France, and his father became Lord Lovat. This Simon afterwards became 11th Lord. In 1746 his title was attainted, and he was beheaded. The title was revived in 1837, and passed to Thomas Fraser of Streichen and Lovat, from whom is descended the present Lord Lovat. His seat is Beaufort Castle on the old estate of Lovat. Another branch of the family is the Frasers (Baronets) of Ledclune; while the House of Fraser of Philorth is represented by Lord Saltoun.

Grant

THE Grants are Celtic. “Stad, Chreag Ealachaidh” (“Stand fast, Craigellachie”) is their slogan. They are of the same stock as the MacGregors, and their location has always been Strathspey. Sir Laurence Graunt, Sheriff of Inverness (1249-58), acquired the greater part of Strathspey. Sir Ian Ruadh Grant, Chief of the clan, in 1381 married Matilda de Glencairnie; and for his descendant, John, Am Bard Ruadh, the lands of Freuchie were created a feudal barony. His successor, Sheumas nan Creach, was a friend of Mary Queen of Scots. From John Grant of Freuchie and Grant, a strong supporter of James IV, are descended the Chiefs of Grant and Strathspey, and the Baronets of Corrimony and of Glenmoriston. James Grant of Grant and his son Ludovick were in the clan fight at the Haughs of Cromdale. Glenmoriston fought for Prince Charlie at Culloden. There are three Baronetcies — Dalvey, 1688; Monymusk, 1705; and Ballindalloch, 1838. Many of the Glenmoriston Grants were banished to Barbadoes after “the ’45.” They have a distinct tartan. The clan raised the Grant or Strathspey Fencibles in 1793, and the “old 97th” in 1794. The first was disbanded in 1799, and the other was drafted into other Highland regiments in 1795. Lord Strathspey is the Chief of the clan.