Blythe

Tweedside

THE River Tweed, or Tweed Water (Scottish Gaelic: Abhainn Thuaidh), is a river 97 miles (156 km) long that flows east across the Border region in Scotland and northern England. Although this tartan – like so many that have a geographical name – is now regarded as a District tartan (‘the River Tweed runs through the Scottish Borders) it doubtless started life as a fashion tartan so named by its designers/weavers, Wilsons of Bannockburn.

Galloway

THIS is a district tartan. Designed in the 1950s by Councillor John Hannay of the Hannah Clan Society. Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-GhΓ idhealaibh/Gallobha) is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian. The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib (“amongst the Gall Gaidheil”). The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning “Stranger-Gaidheil”, originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.