Carmichael

Carmichael

The name comes from the lands of Carmichael in Upper Lanarkshire which were granted to the Douglases in 1321 by King Robert Bruce. Between 1374 and 1384 William, Earl of Douglas, re-granted these lands to the Carmichaels and its feudal barony was confirmed in 1414. They were strong supporters of the Douglases during their struggles …

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Stewart

THE ancestor of the race was a Breton noble, Alan, a cadet of the ancient Counts of Dol and Dinan. Walter Fitz-Alan received from David I the office of High Steward of Scotland, and was progenitor of the House of Stewart. Alexander, the fourth Steward, left two sonsΒ— James, his successor, and Sir John of Bonkyl. From James descended the Royal Stewarts, from Sir John the Bonkyl branch. Walter, the sixth Steward, married Princess Marjory Bruce. Their son reigned as Robert II. From his accession until the death in 1808 of Prince Charlie’s brother, the Cardinal of York, the Chiefs of Clan Stewart were heads of the Royal House of Stewart (Stuart). On the Cardinal’s death the nearest lawful heir bearing the name was concluded to be George, 8th Earl of Galloway, whose successors in the peerage have been received as the subsequent Chiefs of the clan. The Stewarts of Garlies, created Earls of Galloway 1623, descend from Sir John Stewart of Bonkyl. From Sir James, fourth son of Sir John of Bonkyl, sprang the Stewart Lords of Lorne, and the Stewart Earls of Atholl, Buchan and Traquair. The Highland Stewarts of Appin derive from Dougal, a son of Sir John of Lorne, murdered 1463. Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Appin, was Chamberlain of the Isles to James IV. Subsequent Chiefs of the house of Appin and Ardshiel fought for Charles I under Montrose, and for the Chevalier in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. Though the lands are lost, they still bear the title, Stewart of Appin and Ardshiel.

MacDonald

THE MacDonalds are of very ancient origin. The clan founder was the heroic Somerled, who freed his countrymen from the Norse yoke, and rose to power that no subject has equalled. He died in 1164, leaving three sons. The second, Reginald, died in 1207, leaving, with other issue, an eldest son, Donald, from whom the clan takes its name. As Lords of the Isles and Earls of Ross, the Clan Donald were the greatest of the Highland clans, their chief until 1493 ranking as an Island Sovereign. After the fall of the Lords of the Isles, first Glengarry, and then the Lords of Sleat held the chiefship. The Chief of the Glencoe MacDonalds, Mac-Vic-Ian-Mac-Ian, was of Royal descent, and was, with nearly all his clan, massacred by Campbell of Glenlyon in 1692. He had remained constant in his adherence to King James, and loyally took the oath to serve William of Orange, but was rewarded with as foul an act of treachery as was ever perpetrated. Glencoe is the traditional home of the poet Ossian.

MacDougall

THIS is a Celtic clan. The male line of Somerled of the Isles, who died in 1164, is continued in MacDougall of Dunolly, probably descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled, ancestor also of the Lords of Lorn. Dugall’s grandson was King Ewin of Argyll, 1248. His son was Alexander de Ergadia or Alexander of Lorn. He died 1310, and his son was John of Lorn, Bruce’s most obstinate opponent. In the battle of Dalree, 1306, between Bruce and John MacDougall, the famous “Brooch of Lorn” was torn from Bruce’s shoulder. It is now owned by MacDougall of Dunolly. Bruce ultimately overcame the clan. Dougall of Dunolly, a direct descendant of MacDougall who opposed Bruce, entered on the lands of Dunolly 1562. Sir John of Dunolly, who succeeded in 1598, married a daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy. John, styled of Lorn, fought for the Old Chevalier in “the ’15,” and his lands were forfeited, but afterwards restored and are still held by the present MacDougall of MacDougall. There are MacDougalls of Freugh, Garthland, Gillespick, Logan, Mackerstoun, and Muirtoun. The ancestral burial-place is Ardchattan Priory, on Loch Etive. Several of the clan have been distinguished in war, notably Colonel MacDougall, who, in the Swedish service, defeated the Imperialists at Leignitz.

Galloway

THIS is a district tartan. Designed in the 1950s by Councillor John Hannay of the Hannah Clan Society. Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-GhΓ idhealaibh/Gallobha) is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian. The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib (“amongst the Gall Gaidheil”). The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning “Stranger-Gaidheil”, originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.