MacRae

THIS clan is Celtic. Macrae in Gaelic is MacRath, and means “Son of Grace.” The home of the “Wild Macraes” was Kintail, where they did great service for the Earls of Seaforth. They were Constables of Ellandonan Castle. The Rev. Farquhar Macrae (1580-1662), Vicar of Kintail, was a man of mark. Colonel Sir John Macrae (1786-1847) of Ardintoul was an eminent soldier. The Rev. John Macrae (1794-1876) of Knockbain, Ross-shire, was a famous divine. As Jacobites, the Macraes fought gallantly at Sheriffmuir in 1715, and loyally afterwards for the House of Hanover. In 1778 the Macraes were the ringleaders in the mutiny of the Seaforth Highlanders in Edinburgh. They entrenched on Arthur’s Seat, and refused to yield until peacefully approached, and their terms of enlistment fulfilled. Brigadier-General William Macrae (1834—82) was a distinguished leader in the American Confederate army. Major Robert M’Crea, of Guernsey (1754-1835), fought as a loyalist in the American War of Independence. The late Constable of Eilean Donan Castle, Lieut.-Col. John Macrae-Gilstrap of Ballimore, restored the picturesque fortress at Lochalsh.

Gordon

THE Gordons had their origin in the Lowlands. The Scottish Gordons are descended from Sir Adam Gordon, the friend of Wallace, and to whom Bruce granted the lands of Huntly or Strathbogie. He fell at Halidon Hill in 1333. Alexander, 3rd Earl of Huntly, fought at Flodden. George, 6th Earl, was created a Marquis in 1599. George, 4th Marquis, was made Duke of Gordon in 1684. The Dukedom lapsed in 1836, and the Marquisate went to the Earl of Aboyne. The Earls of Aberdeen are descended from Patrick Gordon of Methlic, who fell in battle at Arbroath in 1445. Ten Baronetcies pertain to this clan: Gordonstoun, Cluny, Lismore, Lochinvar, Park, Dalpholly, Earlstoun, Embo, Halkin, Niton. Two regiments have been raised from it. The 92nd, or Gordon Highlanders, raised in 1794, and the old 75th and 92nd linked together, are now the Gordon Highlanders. The Marquis of Huntly is chief of the Gordon clan.