MacCardnie

Mackintosh

THIS is a Celtic clan. In 1672 the Chiefs of Mackintosh were declared by the Lord Lyon King of Arms Chiefs of Clan Chattan. There have been Mackintosh Chiefs for nearly five hundred years. Moy is said to have become theirs in 1336. In 1526 Lachlan, Laird of Mackintosh, was slain by James Malcolmson. The Mackintoshes captured Malcolmson, and cut him to pieces. In 1550 William, 15th Mackintosh, paid a friendly visit to Huntly Castle, but was treacherously beheaded by order of the Countess. In 1689 Mackintosh claimed Glenroy and Glenspean. Keppoch kept him out, and defeated him at Mulroy, the last clan battle. Mackintosh died 1704. His son, Lachlan, died childless 1731, and for a hundred years thereafter no son succeeded a father amongst the Mackintosh chiefs, this remarkable occurrence being ascribed to the curse said to have been placed on the Chief by a jilted lady. The clan fought at Culloden. The Chief remained neutral, and MacGillivray of Dunmaglass commanded. Γ†neas Mackintosh of Mackintosh was created a Baronet by George III, but died childless. His kinsman, the Hon. Angus Mackintosh, residing in Canada, succeeded him, and from him descended the subsequent chiefs. The Mackintosh country is Brae Lochaber, Badenoch, and Strathnairn. The clan historian described the chiefship of the Mackintoshes as territorialΒ— passing with the duthus.

Farquharson

THE Farquharsons are of Celtic origin. Their clan country is Strathdee, in Aberdeenshire. Some of them were originally named Shaw. The offspring of Shaw of Rothiemurchus took the name of Farquharson. In 1645 Farquharson of Invercauld fought at the head of his clan under the famous Marquis of Montrose. The clan was well represented in the army of Prince Charlie in 1745. In 1748 the Laird of Invercauld leased his castle to the Government for ninety years as a military station. The garrison has long been withdrawn. The above-said Laird died in 1750. His son, James, succeeded, and lived until 1806. James left a daughter, Catherine, to whom the insignia of the Farquharson chiefs were confirmed by Lyon Court. She married Captain James Ross, R.N., who adopted the name Farquharson of Invercauld, and to whose line the chiefship descended. The Farquharsons of Inverey have as their most celebrated member the “Black Colonel,” famed in Dee-side legend. In 1745 the clan was led by the “Baron Ban,” Farquharson of Monaltrie.