MacErracher

Lamont

THE Lamonts are a Celtic family. The old seat of the Chief was Castle Toward. This was changed to Ardlamont, between the Kyles of Bute and Loch Fyne, which was the seat of the Chiefs until the close of the nineteenth century. The surname of the clan is from one Lauman. A Duncan MacLamont seems to have been Laird of Lamont in Robert III’s reign. There were also Lamonts of Inverin, the greater part of whose lands was appropriated by the Campbells. John Lamont of Lamont married Lady Jean Campbell, daughter of the Earl of Argyll who fell at Flodden. The Lamonts fought under Montrose at Philiphaugh in 1645. Attacked by the Campbells, they bravely defended themselves in the Castle of Toward, but had to surrender, and were all put to the sword by the victors. In 1685-86 the Laird of Lamont and Archibald Lamont of Silvercraigs were Commissioners in the Parliament at Edinburgh. There were also Lamonts of Willowfield. In course of time the estates passed to Dougal Lamont of Stilaig. His eldest daughter was married to John Lamont of Kilfinnan, and their eldest son succeeded to the estate and chiefship in right of the maternal line.

Farquharson

THE Farquharsons are of Celtic origin. Their clan country is Strathdee, in Aberdeenshire. Some of them were originally named Shaw. The offspring of Shaw of Rothiemurchus took the name of Farquharson. In 1645 Farquharson of Invercauld fought at the head of his clan under the famous Marquis of Montrose. The clan was well represented in the army of Prince Charlie in 1745. In 1748 the Laird of Invercauld leased his castle to the Government for ninety years as a military station. The garrison has long been withdrawn. The above-said Laird died in 1750. His son, James, succeeded, and lived until 1806. James left a daughter, Catherine, to whom the insignia of the Farquharson chiefs were confirmed by Lyon Court. She married Captain James Ross, R.N., who adopted the name Farquharson of Invercauld, and to whose line the chiefship descended. The Farquharsons of Inverey have as their most celebrated member the “Black Colonel,” famed in Dee-side legend. In 1745 the clan was led by the “Baron Ban,” Farquharson of Monaltrie.