MacGaw

Stuart of Bute

Variants, Stuart, Steward, Stewardson.  Walter Fitz-Alan received from David I the office of High Stewart of Scotland, and was progenitor of the House of Stewart. Alexander the 4th Stewart left two sons, James and Sir John of Bonkyl. From James descended the Royal Stewarts, from Sir John the Bonkyl branch. Walter the 6th Stewart married …

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MacKay

THE first historic Chief was Angus Du (1380-1429). He was assassinated, and the clan was ruled by his younger son, until the rightful heir obtained his release from captivity on the Bass Rock, 1437. The latter’s son was Chief and led the clan in the cruel fight of Blair Tannic, Caithness. In 1628 Sir Donald Mackay of Strathnaver, Chief of the clan, was created Lord Reay, with remainder to his heirs male bearing the name and arms of Mackay, which, however, have never been recorded. The major portion of the estates was sold in the seventeenth century to pay the cost of maintaining and transporting 2000 men whom Lord Reay recruited for foreign service to assist the Protestant cause in the great Thirty Years’ War. The earliest Gaelic charter extant was granted by Donald, Lord of the Isles, to Brian Vicar Mackay in 1408.

MacFarlane

THIS is a Celtic clan. Their country was the western shore of Loch Lomond. They took their war cry from Loch Sloy, at the foot of Ben Voirlich. They are descended from Duncan MacGilchrist, mentioned 1296, brother of Mulduin, Earl of Lennox. His grandson was Bartholomew (Gaelic, Parlan), from whom the clan is named. Malcolm received the lands of Arrochar in 1395, but the male line failed, and the lands were forfeited. Andrew MacFarlane married a daughter of the Earl of Lennox, and succeeded in 1493. Sir John MacFarlane fell at Flodden, and Walter MacFarlane of Tarbert was killed at Pinkie in 1547. The clan fought against Queen Mary at Langside. In 1608 they slew Colquhoun of Luss, and were outlawed. In 1644-45 they fought for Montrose. Major-General MacFarlane gallantly captured Ischia, in the Bay of Naples, in 1809. In 1624 many of the clan settled in Aberdeenshire under other names. The last Chief is supposed to have gone to America at the end of the eighteenth century. His house of Arrochar became the property of the Duke of Argyll.