MacKeary

Ulster

Loosely based on garments discovered in a bog at Flanders Townland near Dungiven in County Londonderry in 1956 by a Mr William G Dixon. Materials were scientifically attributed to the end of 16th century. The garments comprised remnants of tartan trews, tunic, belt and coat. In the Paton Collection.

MacNaughton

THE MacNaughtons are of Celtic origin. They are descended from a Pictish king named Nechtan or Nauchton, who founded Abair Neachtain or Abernethy. Their lands lay along the shore of Loch Awe, in Lorn. Alexander III granted the custody of the castle and island of Fraoch Eilean, in Loch Awe, to Gilchrist MacNaughton. The clan fought against Bruce. In 1426 Donald MacNaughton was Bishop-elect of Dunkeld. Sir Alexander MacNaughton of that Ilk was slain at Flodden. Alexander MacNaughton of that Ilk raised a magnificent band of Archers for Charles I, whom he served faithfully. He clove to Charles II likewise, was a courtier, and died in London. A complimentary letter was sent by James VII to MacNaughton of that Ilk in 1689. A branch of the clan settled in Antrim, Ireland. They acquired an estate and castle called Benuardin and were honoured with a Baronetcy. Their line was recognised as chiefs by the Court of the Lord Lyon, and the present Baronet is the Chief of Clan MacNaughton. The old seat of the race was Dunderawe Castle a tall tower on Loch Fyne.

MacGregor

THIS clan claim descent from Gregor, a son of King Alpin, who ruled about 787. They had great possessions in Perthshire and Argyllshire. They held their lands by the sword, fighting bravely for their homes, and gave their enemies such good excuse to urge their dispossession that their name was suppressed by Parliament. In the thirteenth century they held the lands of Glenorchy. Later they appear as tenants of the Campbells. Patrick, who succeeded in 1390, had two younger sonsΒ— John Dhu MacGregor of Glenstrae; and Gregor MacGregor of Roro, in Glenlyon. Ultimately the chieftainship went to the Glenstrae branch. In 1502 the line of Roro was dispossessed by the Campbells. In 1603 the MacGregors overthrew their oppressors, the Colquhouns of Luss, at Glenfruin, For this they were outlawed, and their Chief, Alexander MacGregor, with many of his followers, was executed in Edinburgh in 1604 ; but as late as 1744 MacGregor of Glengyle drew blackmail on the Highland Borders. The suppression of the name was annulled by Parliament in 1774. Rob Roy was of the House of Glengyle. Scott proved that the MacGregors were the real “Children of the Mist.” MacGregor of MacGregor and Balquhidder, whose line holds a Baronetcy, has been officially recognised as Chief of the clan.