MacKonochy

Robertson

THE Chief of the Clan Robertson, known also as the Clann Donnachaidh, was Donnachadh Reamhar, otherwise known as Duncan de Atholia, who was male descendant of the ancient Celtic Earls of Atholl. The clan, however, count their Chiefs from Duncan, under whom they first appear as a clan in support of Robert the Bruce— Duncan’s friend and kinsman. “The Robertsons of Struan,” says Skene, “are unquestionably the oldest family in Scotland, being the sole remaining branch of the Royal House which occupied the throne of Scotland during the eleventh and twelfth centuries.” From first to last the clan is noted for its loyalty to the Stewarts. On the murder of James I at Perth, it was Robert, the Chief of Clann Donnachaidh, who captured his murderers, for which act he had many honours conferred on him by King James I’s successor; and to further commemorate this, father and son took the name of Robertson, which the clan has since retained. Their territory, it is said, at one time extended from the watershed of Rannoch Moor to the gates of Perth. One of the most famous Chiefs was Alexander Robertson of Struan, known as the “Poet Chief.” The Chiefs had castles in Rannoch and at Invervack, near Struan; later, and up to 1860, their principal residence was Dunalastair; other residences were Carie, Dall and Rannoch Barracks. The Chief of the clan is styled Struan-Robertson.

MacDougall

THIS is a Celtic clan. The male line of Somerled of the Isles, who died in 1164, is continued in MacDougall of Dunolly, probably descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled, ancestor also of the Lords of Lorn. Dugall’s grandson was King Ewin of Argyll, 1248. His son was Alexander de Ergadia or Alexander of Lorn. He died 1310, and his son was John of Lorn, Bruce’s most obstinate opponent. In the battle of Dalree, 1306, between Bruce and John MacDougall, the famous “Brooch of Lorn” was torn from Bruce’s shoulder. It is now owned by MacDougall of Dunolly. Bruce ultimately overcame the clan. Dougall of Dunolly, a direct descendant of MacDougall who opposed Bruce, entered on the lands of Dunolly 1562. Sir John of Dunolly, who succeeded in 1598, married a daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy. John, styled of Lorn, fought for the Old Chevalier in “the ’15,” and his lands were forfeited, but afterwards restored and are still held by the present MacDougall of MacDougall. There are MacDougalls of Freugh, Garthland, Gillespick, Logan, Mackerstoun, and Muirtoun. The ancestral burial-place is Ardchattan Priory, on Loch Etive. Several of the clan have been distinguished in war, notably Colonel MacDougall, who, in the Swedish service, defeated the Imperialists at Leignitz.