MacMillan

MacMillan

THE Macmillans are Celts, but whether their first location was in Argyll, Braidalban, or Lochaber, is a matter of dispute. It is certain they had possessions on both sides of Loch Arkaig. A branch of them appeared in Knapdale, Argyllshire, in the sixteenth century. Their feudal grant of Knap from the Lord of the Isles was destined to Macmillan “so long as the wave beats on the rock.” By marriage, one of their chieftains became allied to the MacNeills, and owned Castle Sweyn. The Chief of the Knapdale branch was called Macmillan of Knap. These Macmillans built the Chapel of Kilmore. In their burial-place there is a high stone cross with the legend in Latin: ” This is the cross of Alexander Macmillan.” The Macmillans of Glen Shera, Glen Shira, and others, are descended from a clansman, Gille Maol, who settled at Badokenan on Loch Fyne. The Knapdale succession became extinct, and Macmillan of Dunmore was made Chief. His line also became extinct, and both the Campbells and the MacNeills claimed the lands. The Campbells got possession. The Macmillans of Lochaber were faithful followers of Lochiel. A branch of the clan also settled in Galloway. In later times others went to Arran. The estates were purchased in 1775 by Sir Archibald Campbell of Inverneil.

Cameron

THE Camerons are of pure Celtic ancestry; and Cameron of Lochiel is the chief house of the Clan. Ewen, younger son of Ewen, 13th Chief of Lochiel, was the founder of the house of Erracht. Donald, 2nd of Erracht, joined Prince Charlie at Glenfinnan, where, under Lochiel, he was second in command of the Camerons. His daughter married Cameron of Scamadale, and had a son, Lieutenant Alexander Cameron, who led the Camerons during the last three hours of Waterloo. His eldest son, Sir Alan Cameron of Erracht, K.C.B., went to America, and with the 84th, or Royal Emigrants, helped to defend Quebec against Arnold. In 1793 he raised the 79th or Cameron Highlanders. Sir Ewen Cameron of the main line Β—LochielΒ— was one of the greatest cavaliers during the Civil War. His loyalty was perpetuated in Donald Cameron of Lochiel, one of Prince Charlie’s staunchest friends in 1745. Achnacarry is the seat of the Camerons of Lochiel.