MacTavish

MacTavish

MACTAVISH is the modern spelling of this clan’s name. Originally it had many forms, chief of which were Thompson, Thomason, MacOmish and MacCombie derived from MacTommie, and MacThamais or MacTavish, from the Scots Tammas. In Perthshire, as early as 1488, Donald MacCause (another form of the name) obtained lands near Killin, where he died in 1491. Many of the Argyllshire MacTavishes have changed their name to Thompson. This family claim to be a sept of the Clan Campbell, descended from a son of Colin, the third Campbell, from whom are descended Clan Tavish Campbell. MacTavish of Dunardy was Chief of the clan.

Fraser

THE Frasers are French in origin. Clan Pipe Music: “Cumha Mhic Shimidh” (“Lovat’s Lament”); March: “Spaidsearachd Mhic Shimidh” (Lovat’s March). Gilbert of Fraser is mentioned in 1109. Sir Simon Fraser of Oliver Castle was done to death by Edward I. Hugh was the first designed of Lovat, and from him descends the “Clan Fraser of Lovat.” Hugh, second of Lovat, was made a Baron about 1460. Hugh, 3rd Lord, fell fighting with the MacRonalds near Lochlochy in 1544. Hugh, 9th Lord, died childless. Simon Fraser of Beaufort took possession. His son, Simon, styled himself Master of Lovat, but for his discreditable conduct he had to flee to France, and his father became Lord Lovat. This Simon afterwards became 11th Lord. In 1746 his title was attainted, and he was beheaded. The title was revived in 1837, and passed to Thomas Fraser of Streichen and Lovat, from whom is descended the present Lord Lovat. His seat is Beaufort Castle on the old estate of Lovat. Another branch of the family is the Frasers (Baronets) of Ledclune; while the House of Fraser of Philorth is represented by Lord Saltoun.

Campbell of Argyll

THE name Campbell first appears in 1216, in connection with a proprietor of lands in Stirling; but the first of importance was Neil Campbell, who, in 1296, was made King Edward’s Baillie over lands in Argyll. His great-grandson was created Lord Campbell by James II, and was the first of the family to take the title of Argyll. His grandson, Colin, was made Earl of Argyll in 1457, and Baron of Lorn in 1470. The Marquis of Argyll was the great leader of the Covenanters during the Civil Wars in the reigns of Charles I and Charles II. The 8th Earl was created Duke of Argyll in 1701. The Peerages and estate descended to John, second Duke of Argyll and Earl of Greenwich (died 1743). He was succeeded by his brother, who died without issue, and so the title devolved upon his cousin, General John Campbell of Mamore. Inveraray Castle is the seat of the Campbell Chiefs, whose designation is MacCailein Mhor.