McAllion

MacKay

THE first historic Chief was Angus Du (1380-1429). He was assassinated, and the clan was ruled by his younger son, until the rightful heir obtained his release from captivity on the Bass Rock, 1437. The latter’s son was Chief and led the clan in the cruel fight of Blair Tannic, Caithness. In 1628 Sir Donald Mackay of Strathnaver, Chief of the clan, was created Lord Reay, with remainder to his heirs male bearing the name and arms of Mackay, which, however, have never been recorded. The major portion of the estates was sold in the seventeenth century to pay the cost of maintaining and transporting 2000 men whom Lord Reay recruited for foreign service to assist the Protestant cause in the great Thirty Years’ War. The earliest Gaelic charter extant was granted by Donald, Lord of the Isles, to Brian Vicar Mackay in 1408.

MacDonald of Clanranald

CLAN Macdonald of Clanranald, also known as Clan Ranald or Clan Ronald (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Raghnaill), is a Highland Scottish clan and a branch of Clan Donald, one of the largest Scottish clans. The founder of the Macdonalds of Clanranald is Reginald, 4th great-grandson of Somerled. The Macdonalds of Clanranald descend from Reginald’s elder son Allan and the MacDonells of Glengarry descend from his younger son Donald. The clan chief of the Macdonalds of Clanranald is traditionally designated as The Captain of Clanranald (Scottish Gaelic: Mac Mhic Ailein) and today both the chief and clan are recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, the heraldic judge in Scotland.

MacFarlane

THIS is a Celtic clan. Their country was the western shore of Loch Lomond. They took their war cry from Loch Sloy, at the foot of Ben Voirlich. They are descended from Duncan MacGilchrist, mentioned 1296, brother of Mulduin, Earl of Lennox. His grandson was Bartholomew (Gaelic, Parlan), from whom the clan is named. Malcolm received the lands of Arrochar in 1395, but the male line failed, and the lands were forfeited. Andrew MacFarlane married a daughter of the Earl of Lennox, and succeeded in 1493. Sir John MacFarlane fell at Flodden, and Walter MacFarlane of Tarbert was killed at Pinkie in 1547. The clan fought against Queen Mary at Langside. In 1608 they slew Colquhoun of Luss, and were outlawed. In 1644-45 they fought for Montrose. Major-General MacFarlane gallantly captured Ischia, in the Bay of Naples, in 1809. In 1624 many of the clan settled in Aberdeenshire under other names. The last Chief is supposed to have gone to America at the end of the eighteenth century. His house of Arrochar became the property of the Duke of Argyll.

Grant

THE Grants are Celtic. “Stad, Chreag Ealachaidh” (“Stand fast, Craigellachie”) is their slogan. They are of the same stock as the MacGregors, and their location has always been Strathspey. Sir Laurence Graunt, Sheriff of Inverness (1249-58), acquired the greater part of Strathspey. Sir Ian Ruadh Grant, Chief of the clan, in 1381 married Matilda de Glencairnie; and for his descendant, John, Am Bard Ruadh, the lands of Freuchie were created a feudal barony. His successor, Sheumas nan Creach, was a friend of Mary Queen of Scots. From John Grant of Freuchie and Grant, a strong supporter of James IV, are descended the Chiefs of Grant and Strathspey, and the Baronets of Corrimony and of Glenmoriston. James Grant of Grant and his son Ludovick were in the clan fight at the Haughs of Cromdale. Glenmoriston fought for Prince Charlie at Culloden. There are three Baronetcies — Dalvey, 1688; Monymusk, 1705; and Ballindalloch, 1838. Many of the Glenmoriston Grants were banished to Barbadoes after “the ’45.” They have a distinct tartan. The clan raised the Grant or Strathspey Fencibles in 1793, and the “old 97th” in 1794. The first was disbanded in 1799, and the other was drafted into other Highland regiments in 1795. Lord Strathspey is the Chief of the clan.

Campbell of Argyll

THE name Campbell first appears in 1216, in connection with a proprietor of lands in Stirling; but the first of importance was Neil Campbell, who, in 1296, was made King Edward’s Baillie over lands in Argyll. His great-grandson was created Lord Campbell by James II, and was the first of the family to take the title of Argyll. His grandson, Colin, was made Earl of Argyll in 1457, and Baron of Lorn in 1470. The Marquis of Argyll was the great leader of the Covenanters during the Civil Wars in the reigns of Charles I and Charles II. The 8th Earl was created Duke of Argyll in 1701. The Peerages and estate descended to John, second Duke of Argyll and Earl of Greenwich (died 1743). He was succeeded by his brother, who died without issue, and so the title devolved upon his cousin, General John Campbell of Mamore. Inveraray Castle is the seat of the Campbell Chiefs, whose designation is MacCailein Mhor.