McCoyle

Ulster

Loosely based on garments discovered in a bog at Flanders Townland near Dungiven in County Londonderry in 1956 by a Mr William G Dixon. Materials were scientifically attributed to the end of 16th century. The garments comprised remnants of tartan trews, tunic, belt and coat. In the Paton Collection.

MacDougall

THIS is a Celtic clan. The male line of Somerled of the Isles, who died in 1164, is continued in MacDougall of Dunolly, probably descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled, ancestor also of the Lords of Lorn. Dugall’s grandson was King Ewin of Argyll, 1248. His son was Alexander de Ergadia or Alexander of Lorn. He died 1310, and his son was John of Lorn, Bruce’s most obstinate opponent. In the battle of Dalree, 1306, between Bruce and John MacDougall, the famous “Brooch of Lorn” was torn from Bruce’s shoulder. It is now owned by MacDougall of Dunolly. Bruce ultimately overcame the clan. Dougall of Dunolly, a direct descendant of MacDougall who opposed Bruce, entered on the lands of Dunolly 1562. Sir John of Dunolly, who succeeded in 1598, married a daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy. John, styled of Lorn, fought for the Old Chevalier in “the ’15,” and his lands were forfeited, but afterwards restored and are still held by the present MacDougall of MacDougall. There are MacDougalls of Freugh, Garthland, Gillespick, Logan, Mackerstoun, and Muirtoun. The ancestral burial-place is Ardchattan Priory, on Loch Etive. Several of the clan have been distinguished in war, notably Colonel MacDougall, who, in the Swedish service, defeated the Imperialists at Leignitz.