McKale

MacDougall

THIS is a Celtic clan. The male line of Somerled of the Isles, who died in 1164, is continued in MacDougall of Dunolly, probably descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled, ancestor also of the Lords of Lorn. Dugall’s grandson was King Ewin of Argyll, 1248. His son was Alexander de Ergadia or Alexander of Lorn. He died 1310, and his son was John of Lorn, Bruce’s most obstinate opponent. In the battle of Dalree, 1306, between Bruce and John MacDougall, the famous “Brooch of Lorn” was torn from Bruce’s shoulder. It is now owned by MacDougall of Dunolly. Bruce ultimately overcame the clan. Dougall of Dunolly, a direct descendant of MacDougall who opposed Bruce, entered on the lands of Dunolly 1562. Sir John of Dunolly, who succeeded in 1598, married a daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy. John, styled of Lorn, fought for the Old Chevalier in “the ’15,” and his lands were forfeited, but afterwards restored and are still held by the present MacDougall of MacDougall. There are MacDougalls of Freugh, Garthland, Gillespick, Logan, Mackerstoun, and Muirtoun. The ancestral burial-place is Ardchattan Priory, on Loch Etive. Several of the clan have been distinguished in war, notably Colonel MacDougall, who, in the Swedish service, defeated the Imperialists at Leignitz.

Cameron

THE Camerons are of pure Celtic ancestry; and Cameron of Lochiel is the chief house of the Clan. Ewen, younger son of Ewen, 13th Chief of Lochiel, was the founder of the house of Erracht. Donald, 2nd of Erracht, joined Prince Charlie at Glenfinnan, where, under Lochiel, he was second in command of the Camerons. His daughter married Cameron of Scamadale, and had a son, Lieutenant Alexander Cameron, who led the Camerons during the last three hours of Waterloo. His eldest son, Sir Alan Cameron of Erracht, K.C.B., went to America, and with the 84th, or Royal Emigrants, helped to defend Quebec against Arnold. In 1793 he raised the 79th or Cameron Highlanders. Sir Ewen Cameron of the main line Β—LochielΒ— was one of the greatest cavaliers during the Civil War. His loyalty was perpetuated in Donald Cameron of Lochiel, one of Prince Charlie’s staunchest friends in 1745. Achnacarry is the seat of the Camerons of Lochiel.