Mackenzie

THE MacKenzie clan is of Celtic origin. Its home has ever been in Ross-shire; and it rose to power under a great Chief, Alexander lonraech, 7th Chief of Kintail, who ruled in 1427. His grandson, John, 9th Chief, followed James IV to Flodden, and lived to fight for Mary Queen of Scots, at Langside. Kenneth, the next Chief, was in 1609 created Lord Mackenzie of Kintail, and his son Colin, Earl of Seaforth in 1623. William, 5th Earl, was forfeited as a Jacobite in 1715; but his grandson was re-created Earl of Seaforth in 1771, and raised the old Seaforth Highlanders in 1778. His cousin and eventual successor, Francis Humberstone Mackenzie, was re-created Lord Seaforth in 1797; and at his death in 1815 his daughter Mary, Lady Stuart Mackenzie of Seaforth, became Caberfeidh and Chief of the clan. Her grandson, James Stewart-Mackenzie, Lord Seaforth of Brahan 1921, was the last chief to hold a peerage, but his heir of line, the Laird of Seaforth, Chief of the Clan MacKenzie, still holds sway in their castle of Brahan.

Galloway

THIS is a district tartan. Designed in the 1950s by Councillor John Hannay of the Hannah Clan Society. Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh/Gallobha) is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian. The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib (“amongst the Gall Gaidheil”). The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning “Stranger-Gaidheil”, originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.