Lamont

THE Lamonts are a Celtic family. The old seat of the Chief was Castle Toward. This was changed to Ardlamont, between the Kyles of Bute and Loch Fyne, which was the seat of the Chiefs until the close of the nineteenth century. The surname of the clan is from one Lauman. A Duncan MacLamont seems to have been Laird of Lamont in Robert III’s reign. There were also Lamonts of Inverin, the greater part of whose lands was appropriated by the Campbells. John Lamont of Lamont married Lady Jean Campbell, daughter of the Earl of Argyll who fell at Flodden. The Lamonts fought under Montrose at Philiphaugh in 1645. Attacked by the Campbells, they bravely defended themselves in the Castle of Toward, but had to surrender, and were all put to the sword by the victors. In 1685-86 the Laird of Lamont and Archibald Lamont of Silvercraigs were Commissioners in the Parliament at Edinburgh. There were also Lamonts of Willowfield. In course of time the estates passed to Dougal Lamont of Stilaig. His eldest daughter was married to John Lamont of Kilfinnan, and their eldest son succeeded to the estate and chiefship in right of the maternal line.

Galloway

THIS is a district tartan. Designed in the 1950s by Councillor John Hannay of the Hannah Clan Society. Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh/Gallobha) is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian. The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib (“amongst the Gall Gaidheil”). The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning “Stranger-Gaidheil”, originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.