McLehose

MacThomas

The name Thomas derives from the Gaelic Mac Thomais, other variants include MacCombie, MacCombe and MacComie. It is also often anglicised as MacTavish which is a common name in Argyll where the Clan Tavish was a minor sept of the Campbells descending from an illegitimate son of the Lord of Lochow. The main group of …

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Mackintosh

THIS is a Celtic clan. In 1672 the Chiefs of Mackintosh were declared by the Lord Lyon King of Arms Chiefs of Clan Chattan. There have been Mackintosh Chiefs for nearly five hundred years. Moy is said to have become theirs in 1336. In 1526 Lachlan, Laird of Mackintosh, was slain by James Malcolmson. The Mackintoshes captured Malcolmson, and cut him to pieces. In 1550 William, 15th Mackintosh, paid a friendly visit to Huntly Castle, but was treacherously beheaded by order of the Countess. In 1689 Mackintosh claimed Glenroy and Glenspean. Keppoch kept him out, and defeated him at Mulroy, the last clan battle. Mackintosh died 1704. His son, Lachlan, died childless 1731, and for a hundred years thereafter no son succeeded a father amongst the Mackintosh chiefs, this remarkable occurrence being ascribed to the curse said to have been placed on the Chief by a jilted lady. The clan fought at Culloden. The Chief remained neutral, and MacGillivray of Dunmaglass commanded. Γ†neas Mackintosh of Mackintosh was created a Baronet by George III, but died childless. His kinsman, the Hon. Angus Mackintosh, residing in Canada, succeeded him, and from him descended the subsequent chiefs. The Mackintosh country is Brae Lochaber, Badenoch, and Strathnairn. The clan historian described the chiefship of the Mackintoshes as territorialΒ— passing with the duthus.

Campbell of Argyll

THE name Campbell first appears in 1216, in connection with a proprietor of lands in Stirling; but the first of importance was Neil Campbell, who, in 1296, was made King Edward’s Baillie over lands in Argyll. His great-grandson was created Lord Campbell by James II, and was the first of the family to take the title of Argyll. His grandson, Colin, was made Earl of Argyll in 1457, and Baron of Lorn in 1470. The Marquis of Argyll was the great leader of the Covenanters during the Civil Wars in the reigns of Charles I and Charles II. The 8th Earl was created Duke of Argyll in 1701. The Peerages and estate descended to John, second Duke of Argyll and Earl of Greenwich (died 1743). He was succeeded by his brother, who died without issue, and so the title devolved upon his cousin, General John Campbell of Mamore. Inveraray Castle is the seat of the Campbell Chiefs, whose designation is MacCailein Mhor.