Mills

Ulster

Loosely based on garments discovered in a bog at Flanders Townland near Dungiven in County Londonderry in 1956 by a Mr William G Dixon. Materials were scientifically attributed to the end of 16th century. The garments comprised remnants of tartan trews, tunic, belt and coat. In the Paton Collection.

Galbraith

The name Galbraith probably originates from the Britons of the Kingdom of Strathclyde which did not become part of Scotland until 1124. The first recorded chief of the Galbraiths appears in the 12th century, he married a daughter of Alwyn Og, son of Muireadhach, 1st Earl of Lennox. The fourth chief Sir William Galbraith married …

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Gallowater

The Gallowater district tartan, sometimes referred to as the ‘Gala Water’ was first mentioned in the records of Wilson’s of Bannockburn in 1793. The design progressed until 1819 when this ‘New’ sett was recorded in the company’s pattern book with a red band and a thin white stripe.

Gordon

THE Gordons had their origin in the Lowlands. The Scottish Gordons are descended from Sir Adam Gordon, the friend of Wallace, and to whom Bruce granted the lands of Huntly or Strathbogie. He fell at Halidon Hill in 1333. Alexander, 3rd Earl of Huntly, fought at Flodden. George, 6th Earl, was created a Marquis in 1599. George, 4th Marquis, was made Duke of Gordon in 1684. The Dukedom lapsed in 1836, and the Marquisate went to the Earl of Aboyne. The Earls of Aberdeen are descended from Patrick Gordon of Methlic, who fell in battle at Arbroath in 1445. Ten Baronetcies pertain to this clan: Gordonstoun, Cluny, Lismore, Lochinvar, Park, Dalpholly, Earlstoun, Embo, Halkin, Niton. Two regiments have been raised from it. The 92nd, or Gordon Highlanders, raised in 1794, and the old 75th and 92nd linked together, are now the Gordon Highlanders. The Marquis of Huntly is chief of the Gordon clan.