Moore

Muir

The name means ‘living by a moor or heath’. The future King Robert II married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan, in 1346. Ten years later the marriage was challenged, possibly on the grounds of there being a degree of consanguinity between them, and a dispensation was sought from the Pope.

Tara

This tartan is a colour modification of MacLean of Duart. Believed for many years to have been recorded in ‘Clans Originaux’ (Paris, 1880) as Murphy and later renamed ‘Tara’ (1967). Later research suggests that none of the tartans included in Clans Originaux are Irish.

Gordon

THE Gordons had their origin in the Lowlands. The Scottish Gordons are descended from Sir Adam Gordon, the friend of Wallace, and to whom Bruce granted the lands of Huntly or Strathbogie. He fell at Halidon Hill in 1333. Alexander, 3rd Earl of Huntly, fought at Flodden. George, 6th Earl, was created a Marquis in 1599. George, 4th Marquis, was made Duke of Gordon in 1684. The Dukedom lapsed in 1836, and the Marquisate went to the Earl of Aboyne. The Earls of Aberdeen are descended from Patrick Gordon of Methlic, who fell in battle at Arbroath in 1445. Ten Baronetcies pertain to this clan: Gordonstoun, Cluny, Lismore, Lochinvar, Park, Dalpholly, Earlstoun, Embo, Halkin, Niton. Two regiments have been raised from it. The 92nd, or Gordon Highlanders, raised in 1794, and the old 75th and 92nd linked together, are now the Gordon Highlanders. The Marquis of Huntly is chief of the Gordon clan.

Campbell of Argyll

THE name Campbell first appears in 1216, in connection with a proprietor of lands in Stirling; but the first of importance was Neil Campbell, who, in 1296, was made King Edward’s Baillie over lands in Argyll. His great-grandson was created Lord Campbell by James II, and was the first of the family to take the title of Argyll. His grandson, Colin, was made Earl of Argyll in 1457, and Baron of Lorn in 1470. The Marquis of Argyll was the great leader of the Covenanters during the Civil Wars in the reigns of Charles I and Charles II. The 8th Earl was created Duke of Argyll in 1701. The Peerages and estate descended to John, second Duke of Argyll and Earl of Greenwich (died 1743). He was succeeded by his brother, who died without issue, and so the title devolved upon his cousin, General John Campbell of Mamore. Inveraray Castle is the seat of the Campbell Chiefs, whose designation is MacCailein Mhor.