Tweedside

THE River Tweed, or Tweed Water (Scottish Gaelic: Abhainn Thuaidh), is a river 97 miles (156 km) long that flows east across the Border region in Scotland and northern England. Although this tartan – like so many that have a geographical name – is now regarded as a District tartan (‘the River Tweed runs through the Scottish Borders) it doubtless started life as a fashion tartan so named by its designers/weavers, Wilsons of Bannockburn.

Galloway

THIS is a district tartan. Designed in the 1950s by Councillor John Hannay of the Hannah Clan Society. Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh/Gallobha) is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian. The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib (“amongst the Gall Gaidheil”). The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning “Stranger-Gaidheil”, originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.

Gordon

THE Gordons had their origin in the Lowlands. The Scottish Gordons are descended from Sir Adam Gordon, the friend of Wallace, and to whom Bruce granted the lands of Huntly or Strathbogie. He fell at Halidon Hill in 1333. Alexander, 3rd Earl of Huntly, fought at Flodden. George, 6th Earl, was created a Marquis in 1599. George, 4th Marquis, was made Duke of Gordon in 1684. The Dukedom lapsed in 1836, and the Marquisate went to the Earl of Aboyne. The Earls of Aberdeen are descended from Patrick Gordon of Methlic, who fell in battle at Arbroath in 1445. Ten Baronetcies pertain to this clan: Gordonstoun, Cluny, Lismore, Lochinvar, Park, Dalpholly, Earlstoun, Embo, Halkin, Niton. Two regiments have been raised from it. The 92nd, or Gordon Highlanders, raised in 1794, and the old 75th and 92nd linked together, are now the Gordon Highlanders. The Marquis of Huntly is chief of the Gordon clan.